Periodontal Splinting in Stockton, CA

Periodontal Splinting

Even though we try our best to care for our teeth, sometimes good hygiene isn’t enough to save our teeth. Over time and under certain causes, individual teeth can weaken and become less stable. When this happens, the teeth are more likely to be damaged and even fall out. Once a tooth weakens to the point of falling out, it can be difficult to save it. That is, until recent advances in dental technology make it possible to bond multiple teeth together thanks to a technique known as periodontal splinting.

What is Periodontal Splinting?

Periodontal splinting is a way to bond two or more teeth together that have weakened, creating a stronger and more stable structure. Since teeth lose strength at the roots, they become more likely to fall out. By bonding several teeth together, the collective strength of the teeth increases and makes them less likely to fall out.

The process is done by a dentist applying a special type of dental cement to a weakened tooth and one or more nearby teeth. This creates a cohesive unit and strengthens all the teeth bonded together.

In some cases, the teeth attached to the weakened tooth may have crowns placed on them to strengthen the hold between the teeth to make it more secure.

Does Periodontal Splinting Hurt?

While you may experience some discomfort during the actual procedure, the process and after-effects of the splinting should be painless. It may take a little while to get used to your new splinted teeth, but once you are accustomed to them, you’ll find you have a stronger bite and have to worry less about tooth damage.

Is Periodontal Splinting Permanent?

Yes, periodontal splinting is a permanent solution to weakened teeth. Because crowns are usually placed over the affected teeth, the entire process is meant to last for decades.

Who Should Get Periodontal Splinting?

It is always a good idea to get a recommendation from your dentist first. Still, suppose you notice that one or more of your teeth is becoming loose or has been structurally damaged to the point that it becomes difficult to eat normally. In that case, you might consider asking your dentist about periodontal splinting.

This is an excellent way to save teeth that would otherwise need to be extracted or replaced, especially if it’s only a few teeth and you’re not ready for implants or dentures.